The Curious Case of Chiyaan

 

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For close to a decade now, Vikram has been a boon to the film critics and reviewers.

Writing about his movies is easy because it is basically a template and one just had to replace a few names in the cast and crew to suit a particular movie. Barring one or two movies in between, it predominantly carried one line that resonated across every review of his films in the last 10-12 years.

“*Insert superlatives* acting by Vikram is letdown by *insert any department of film-making* by *insert any name*”

Vikram, a National award winning actor, has unfortunately type-cast himself in the worst possible way. No reviewer ever talks anything about his movies except that he was exceptional in his portrayal of the protagonist.

It is getting rather tiring to watch Vikram do his style of acting, film after film, without his movies being anything except a showcase of his already widely accepted prowess.

IRUMUGAN (Two-Face), the second movie directed by Anand Shankar is riddled with its own dichotomy. It is entertaining as well as dull, interesting as well as sleep-inducing and you get where I’m going with this right?

Vikram plays both a RAW Agent Akilan who obviously has a sordid past and the antagonist ‘Love’, an Evil Mastermind. Nayanthara is Meera Akilan,  a fellow RAW Agent. I do not have a gauge to measure the chemistry between the lead pair and other shizz like that, but the camera loves them.

Nayantara is astonishingly beautiful on screen.

The movie is basically about Akilan, the RAW agent, trying to stop Love from selling a drug to terrorist organisations. The drug makes its users possess inhuman power for a period of five minutes. Adolf Hitler (in a dynamic guest-role) promulgates the history and the effect of this drug. It was mildly disturbing to hear the isolated cheers and whistles when Hitler was showed on screen.

Nayanthara is ravishingly gorgeous on screen. 

Akilan is helped in this endeavour by Aaayushi (Nithya Menen, whose only reason to do this film should have been the pay cheque) and Muthiah(Thambi Ramaiah, who is now suffering from a severe bout of Prakashrajitis[evidently trying hard to do something different in a beaten-to-death role]).

Nayanthara is splendidly resplendent on screen.

I am not skilled enough or rather, skilled at all to talk about the technical aspects of this movie, but the movie was wonderfully pleasing to the eye and with such a high budget behind the making, it is imperative that they are top-notch and the entire team delivers it with style.

 Nayanthara is wonderfully alluring on screen.

I’ve always liked Harris Jayaraj’s music even if many songs seem vaguely familiar at times. The background score for this movie worked perfectly and the characteristic whistle by Love had a chillingly satisfying effect. The only problem was the placement of these songs. It was a familiar sinking feeling that had crept when I’d watched Anand Shankar’s first movie, Arima Nambi. It might be a trait imbibed from his Guru, A.R.Murugadoss.

Nayanthara is drop-dead attractive on screen. 

There had been a considerable criticism against the movie and its team regarding the portrayal of Love, the antagonist. The past experiences from the movie ‘I’ made me quite skeptical too. To be honest, with my limited knowledge and checking with my personal intolerance meter, I found myself to have a clear conscience.

Nayantara is self-assuredly pristine on screen.

There are quite a few glaring logical loopholes, but that’s okay. It was fun to watch Vikram present Love with such flair and panache. I loved Love and I know this is probably the only time I can get away with saying it without sounding like an extra in a Karan Johar movie. Though there are lot of scenes that gave me a sense of deja-vu, even that is acceptable. Probably being a “Haasthigan” (Kamal Haasan Fan), I spot similarities with his films a lot more easily.

I am running out of words to describe Nayantara.

There were a couple of noticeable problems I had with this movie.

  1. The unstoppable spoon-feeding to the audience. For example, “X” repeating the same dialogues said by “Y” just a scene earlier to convey the same bloody thing to the same bloody person “Z”, who had heard it from “Y” just a second earlier. It reminded me of that unintentionally hilarious scene from Dhoom 3 (yes, the entire series is laughable), where a European cop in a high-intense cop meeting about cracking a bank robbery says,”I think the bank was robbed by…… Thieves”. To paraphrase a Kamal Haasan dialogue, “We are all adults Mr.Anand Shankar. We know 2+2 is 4. You don’t have to teach us 2 in the mind, 2 in the hand, after 2; 3… 4…”
  2. The lack of any memorable secondary characters(Don’t only think of Karthik from Mouna Raagam, think also of Manorama from Samsaaram Adhu Minsaaram).

Got it. Nayantara is vivaciously brilliant on screen.

The movie actually had quite a few things working for it. It had a decent premise, an excellent cast and a brilliant technical team. However, it felt unfulfilling and was more like a broken promise. It could be because there might have been compromises on the director’s part for various reasons, time constraints and even a most whimsical reason like my pretty foul mood because of the lack of mango juice in my college canteen.

Nayantara is just amazing on screen (Clearly ran out of words)

Since it is always easy to blame the filmmakers, I’ll also do the same and say that it was the fault of the cast and crew to have failed to engage me for 155 minutes.

This is the first movie to be rated on the new rating system called TBT (Thoongaadhey Buddy Thoongaadhey) system. This gets the rating of “I didn’t sleep at all during the movie, but I just could have” (Thoongala aana thoongirkalaam)

P.S. Nayantara is WOW. Watching a movie in the computer or even a 50 inch LED TV wouldn’t make it even half as good as looking at her on the big screen. Avoid Piracy.

P.P.S. It is high time people realise that any form of writing about a movie is purely subjective and is only a personal opinion.

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One thought on “The Curious Case of Chiyaan

  1. I’m sure you weren’t inserting phrases about Nayan just to hold someone to read the entire review… You don’t have to. Your language and review is anyway fabulous… I get it that you were swept off your feet by Nayan…I’m watching the movie on Sunday but I already get the feeling…:D

    Liked by 1 person

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